Monday, November 7, 2011 - Posted by Lhakpa Lama at 10:42 PM


Amend Rome statute‚ AI-Nepal tells DPM Shrestha

   

THT ONLINE/FILE PHOTO
RSS
During the meeting‚ the AI- Nepal underlined the importance of amending the statute to deliver justice through International Court‚ as impunity was mounting in the country during the ongoing transitional period.
KATHMANDU: Representatives of the Amnesty International (AI) - Nepal met Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Foreign Affairs Narayankaji Shrestha on Sunday at the latter’s office and demanded to ratify the Rome statute of International Criminal Court (ICC).

During the meeting, the AI- Nepal underlined the importance of amending the statute to deliver justice through International Court, as impunity was mounting in the country during the ongoing transitional period.

On the occasion, Deputy Prime Minister Shrestha said that the government is committed to end every form of impunities flourishing in the country, to improve the situation of human rights inside the country.

He also assured that the incumbent government would hold required discussions with all concerned parties and move ahead for the amendment of the statute.

AI Nepal has been campaigning for the ratification of the Rome Statute since 2000 to end the culture of impunity in Nepal.

One of the core principles of ICC assumes that permanent solutions to impunity must be found at the domestic level despite the ICC investigates and prosecutes the core international crimes like genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, only in situations where states are unable or unwilling to do so by themselves.

WE ARE COMMITTED TO RATIFY ROME STATUTE: NEPAL GOVERNMENT

Tuesday, October 11, 2011 - Posted by Lhakpa Lama at 2:22 AM


Nepal government again expressed it's full commitments to ratify the Rome Statute of International Criminal Court (ICC). On a talk programme 'Why Rome Statute is not being Ratified?' organized by Amnesty International Nepal on 20 July 2011, Minister for Energy Gokarna Bista said, "Government expresses its full commitment to ratify Rome Statute and is now preparing for it doing a consultation with all political parties." He further added, "The government is committed to end the culture of impunity in Nepal."
Likewise, Constituent Assembly (CA) member and popular youth leader of Nepali congress Gagan Thapa urged all political parties not to afraid of ratifying the Statute. He also said that he will register a resolution in the Parliament with the signatures of CA members in the near future.
CA member Binod Pahadi from UCPN (Maoist) also expressed his full commitments on the occasion. Representing the Maoist party he said that his party is not against the ratification of Rome statute. He also called Nepal government to bring the proposal in the parliament.
Similarly, leader of Madhesi Rights Forum (Democratic) and CA member Ramjanam Chaudhari also expressed his full commitments to the statute. He said that "We got many commitments but now we arrived on a step of action." He further added-"We need no more commitments but need actions."
CA members of Nepali congress Laxmi Pariyar said, "If we ratify the Rome Statute then we can get justice".
Civil Society leader and Journalist Shyam Shrestha and president of Human Rights and Peace Society Homkanta Choulagain said that political parties should be serious to ratify the Statute.
On the occasion, representative of Amnesty International's International Secretariat in London Frida Kruijt, Chairperson of AI Nepal Hem Kumar Khadka and General Secretary Rashmila Bhochhibhoya made it clear that the Rome Statute has no retrospective effects, so no one need to be afraid ratify it.
At the beginning, AI Nepal's Director Rameshwar Nepal made a presentation about the Rome Statute and increasing trend of impunity in Nepal.
The establishment of a new permanent International Criminal Court in 2002 represents a major breakthrough in international justice. The Court will investigate and prosecute genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes when national authorities are unable or unwilling to do so.
The Court will therefore act as a catalyst for states to fulfill their primary obligations to investigate and prosecute the crimes.
AI Nepal has been campaigning for the ratification of the Rome Statute since 2000.


(Source : http://amnestynepal.org/campaigns/ai-nepal-activities/we-are-committed-to-ratify-rome-statute:-nepal-government.html )

Global Coalition Calls on Nepal to Join the International Criminal Court

Monday, August 29, 2011 - Posted by Lhakpa Lama at 10:53 PM
The Coalition for the International Criminal Court today called on Nepal to demonstrate its commitment to justice and the rule of law by acceding to the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (ICC)—the world’s first and only permanent international court to prosecute war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide. Nepal is the focus of the Coalition’s Universal Ratification Campaign (URC) for August 2011, a monthly campaign launched to call upon a different country to join the Rome Statute—the ICC’s founding treaty.

In a letter dated 1 August 2011 to Nepalese President H.E. Mr. Ram Baran Yadav, the Coalition—a global network of more than 2,500 civil society organizations in 150 countries advocating for a fair, effective and independent ICC—urged the government of Nepal to prioritize its accession of the Rome Statute.
The Rome Statute came into force in July 2002 and now has the support of well over half of the world’s nations, with 116 states having ratified or acceded to the treaty. A number of states around the world including the Philippines, Cape Verde, Malaysia and the Maldives are nearing completion of their ratification processes.
To date, only 14 states in the Asia-Pacific region have recognized the jurisdiction of the ICC. By joining the ICC, Nepal would set an important example for states throughout the Asia-Pacific region that have yet to embrace the Rome Statute system.

“We are encouraged that a growing number of states in the Asia region are moving forward in their ratification processes, as it is one that remains underrepresented at the ICC,” said William R. Pace, Convenor of the Coalition. “By embracing the Rome Statute system, Nepal will strengthen its leadership in the Asia region toward increasing accountability for the gravest crimes,” Pace added.
The Coalition also recalled Nepal’s past efforts to join the ICC, in particular the Nepalese Legislature’s decision on 24 July 2006 to unanimously endorse a proposal to accede to the Rome Statute and the tabling of the matter before the Cabinet in February 2009.

“ Nepal ‘s accession will signal the government’s readiness to fulfill its promise to end impunity for genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes” said Evelyn Balais-Serrano, the Coalition’s Asia Regional Coordinator. “It is time for the government to turn its commitments to action and take concrete steps to join the ICC.”

As a state party, Nepal would be able to actively participate in the annual Assembly of States Parties (ASP) of the ICC, during which states make important decisions in relation to the administration of the Court, including the election of judges and prosecutors. In December 2011, six new judges, a new chief prosecutor and other Court officials will be elected by the ASP. By acceding to the Rome Statute by 2 September 2011, Nepal can nominate and vote for candidates to these important posts to ensure national and regional representation in this new mechanism for international justice.

(Source: http://www.weinformers.net/2011/08/04/global-coalition-calls-on-nepal-to-join-the-international-criminal-court/)

Global Coalition Calls on Nepal to Join the International Criminal Court

Saturday, August 6, 2011 - Posted by Lhakpa Lama at 11:39 PM


Civil Society Says Accession to the Rome Statute is a Priority to End Impunity.

New York, USA – The Coalition for the International Criminal Court today called on Nepal to demonstrate its commitment to justice and the rule of law by acceding to the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (ICC)—the world’s first and only permanent international court to prosecute war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide. Nepal is the focus of the Coalition’s Universal Ratification Campaign (URC) for August 2011, a monthly campaign launched to call upon a different country to join the Rome Statute—the ICC’s founding treaty.  
In a letter dated 1 August 2011 to Nepalese President H.E. Mr. Ram Baran Yadav, the Coalition—a global network of more than 2,500 civil society organizations in 150 countries advocating for a fair, effective and independent ICC—urged the government of Nepal to prioritize its accession of the Rome Statute.  
The Rome Statute came into force in July 2002 and now has the support of well over half of the world’s nations, with 116 states having ratified or acceded to the treaty.  A number of states around the world including the Philippines, Cape Verde, Malaysia and the Maldives are nearing completion of their ratification processes. 
 
To date, only 14 states in the Asia-Pacific region have recognized the jurisdiction of the ICC. By joining the ICC, Nepal would set an important example for states throughout the Asia-Pacific region that have yet to embrace the Rome Statute system.
 
“We are encouraged that a growing number of states in the Asia region are moving forward in their ratification processes, as it is one that remains underrepresented  at the ICC,” said  William R. Pace, Convenor of the Coalition. “By embracing the Rome Statute system, Nepal will strengthen its leadership in the Asia region toward increasing accountability for the gravest crimes,” Pace added.
 
The Coalition also recalled Nepal’s past efforts to join the ICC, in particular the Nepalese Legislature’s decision on 24 July 2006 to unanimously endorse a proposal to accede to the Rome Statute and the tabling of the matter before the Cabinet in February 2009.
 
“Nepal's accession will signal the government's readiness to fulfill its promise to end impunity for genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes” said Evelyn Balais-Serrano, the Coalition’s Asia Regional Coordinator. “It is time for the government to turn its commitments to action and take concrete steps to join the ICC.”
 
As a state party, Nepal would be able to actively participate in the annual Assembly of States Parties (ASP) of the ICC, during which states make important decisions in relation to the administration of the Court, including the election of judges and prosecutors. In December 2011, six new judges, a new chief prosecutor and other Court officials will be elected by the ASP. By acceding to the Rome Statute by 2 September 2011, Nepal can nominate and vote for candidates to these important posts to ensure national and regional representation in this new mechanism for international justice



(Source : http://www.barnaclegrenada.com/content/view/2000/52/ )

About the International Criminal Court

Monday, August 1, 2011 - Posted by Lhakpa Lama at 3:53 AM
Pre-Trial Judges conducting a hearing © ICC-CPI / Associated Press



 







The International Criminal Court (ICC), governed by the Rome Statute, is the first permanent, treaty based, international criminal court established to help end impunity for the perpetrators of the most serious crimes of concern to the international community.
The ICC is an independent international organisation, and is not part of the United Nations system. Its seat is at The Hague in the Netherlands. Although the Court’s expenses are funded primarily by States Parties, it also receives voluntary contributions from governments, international organisations, individuals, corporations and other entities.
The international community has long aspired to the creation of a permanent international court, and, in the 20th century, it reached consensus on definitions of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes. The Nuremberg and Tokyo trials addressed war crimes, crimes against peace, and crimes against humanity committed during the Second World War.

In the 1990s after the end of the Cold War, tribunals like the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia and for Rwanda were the result of consensus that impunity is unacceptable. However, because they were established to try crimes committed only within a specific time-frame and during a specific conflict, there was general agreement that an independent, permanent criminal court was needed.

On 17 July 1998, the international community reached an historic milestone when 120 States adopted the Rome Statute, the legal basis for establishing the permanent International Criminal Court.
The Rome Statute entered into force on 1 July 2002 after ratification by 60 countries.

(Source :  http://www.icc-cpi.int/Menus/ICC/About+the+Court/ )

Interaction on the International Criminal Court

Monday, July 25, 2011 - Posted by Kathmandu Youth Network at 12:34 AM

An interaction between an international delegation of Amnesty International (AI) and a range of actors including non-governmental organizations, lawyers and members of civil society held in Kathmandu on 25 September 2007. A delegation of the AI visiting Nepal to work with Amnesty International Nepal to promote ratification and implementation of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (ICC).
In the program participants briefed about the campaigning activities that the human rights organization and civil society have been undertaking and challenges to get ICC statute ratified in Nepal.
The delegation of expert made up of Linda Billfalk, Member of Amnesty International's Working Group on International Justice and Evelyn Serrano, Asia Coordinator of Coalition for the International Criminal Court had seek to identify the ways in which Amnesty International can support the efforts for the ratification of the ICC. The delegation´s visit to Kathmandu was co-ordinated with a mission by Parliamentarians for Global Action (PGA), which organised a round-table discussion for Nepalese parliamentarians today. David Donat Cattin, director of PGA, joined some of the meetings of the delegation.
During the meetings government representatives expressed support for the ICC. However, they did not offer any commitment to proceed with ratification immediately. The delegation urged the government to complete ratification as a matter of the utmost urgency to ensure that the ICC can act as a deterrent against any future crimes and a protection for the Nepalese people.
In meetings with the leaders of several political parties as well as parliamentarians from different parties, the delegation welcomed the active support that parliament has demonstrated for the ICC by approving a proposal providing for the government to ratify the Rome Statute on 25 July 2006. The delegation discussed in detail with them how the ICC works in practice and the benefits that it offers to Nepal (see below). They urged parliamentarians to continue calling for Nepal’s immediate ratification.
The delegation also met with the Nepal Police, Armed Police Force as well as the Nepal Army and welcomed their statements of strong support for the ICC and Nepal’s ratification